Lobes of the Brain

The human brain consists of the frontal, occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes. Read on to discover how these four areas in the brain function to support our thoughts and responses and discover what can happen when these areas of the brain are injured.

The human brain is the most complicated organ in the body. Made up of 50 to 100 billion neurons, the human brain remains among the world’s biggest unsolved mysteries. Here we will take a better take a look at the four lobes of the brain to discover more about the location and function of each lobe.

Four Human Brain Lobes and their Functions

The brain is divided into 4 areas, called lobes (as shown in the image above). The frontal lobe, occipital lobe, parietal lobe, and temporal lobe have various areas and functions that support the actions and actions of the body. Let’s start by recognizing where each lobe is positioned in the brain.

Position of the Lobes

The frontal lobe is the psychological nerve center of the brain responsible for forming our personality and affecting out choices. The frontal lobe lies at the front of the central sulcus where it gets information signals from other lobes of the brain.

The parietal lobe processes sensory information for cognitive purposes and helps collaborate spatial relations so we can understand the world around us. The parietal lobe lives in the middle area of the brain behind the main sulcus, above the occipital lobe.

The temporal lobe is located on the bottom of the brain listed below the lateral crack. This lobe is also the location of the main auditory cortex, which is important for translating the noises and the language we hear.

The occipital lobe is located at the back portion of the brain behind the parietal and temporal lobes. The occipital lobe is mostly responsible for processing acoustic details.

Functions of the Lobes

Brain Lobes and their Functions

The cerebrum or cortex is the biggest part of the human brain, related to higher brain function such as idea and action. The cortex is divided into four areas, called “lobes”: the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and temporal lobe.

Frontal Lobe

The frontal lobe has numerous functions the majority of which center on controlling social behavior. Here are some of the essential functions of the frontal lobe:

  • Cognition, problem solving and thinking
  • Motor ability development
  • Parts of speech
  • Impulse control
  • Spontaneity
  • Managing feelings
  • Controling sexual urges
  • Planning

It is more common to hurt the frontal lobe than the other lobes of the brain because the lobe lies at the front of the skull. The results of damage to the frontal lobe often result in personality changes, difficulty controlling sexual prompts, and other impulsive and risk-taking habits.

Parietal lobe

The parietal lobe has numerous functions consisting of sensation, perception, and spatial thinking, states iytmed.com. This lobe is accountable for processing sensory details from various parts of the body. Here are a few of the functions of the parietal lobe:

  • Picking up pain, pressure, and touch
  • Managing and processing the body’s five senses
  • Motion and visual orientation
  • Speech
  • Visual understanding and acknowledgment
  • Cognition and details processing

Damage to the parietal lobe can result in problems with spatial reasoning, reading, writing, understanding signs and language. Right-sided damage to the parietal area can affect an individual’s capability to gown or groom his or herself. While left-sided damage can lead to language conditions and conditions with understanding.

Temporal lobe

There are two temporal lobes located on both sides of the brain that remain in close proximity to the ears. The main function of the temporal lobes is to processing acoustic noises. Other functions of the temporal lobe include:

  • Since the hippocampus, or part of the brain responsible for moving short-term memories into long-lasting memories, lies in the temporal lobe, the temporal lobe helps to form long-term memories and process brand-new info.
  • The development of visual and spoken memories.
  • The interpretation of smells and sounds.

The type of impairment that arises from damage to the temporal lobe depends on where the damage occurred in the lobe. Temporal lobe damage can cause difficulty processing acoustic sensations and visual understandings, problems concentrating on visual and/or auditory stimuli, long-term memory problems, changes in character, and changes in sexual behavior.

Occipital lobe

The occipital lobe, the tiniest of the four lobes, is located near the posterior region of the cerebral cortex, near the back of the skull. The occipital lobe is the main visual processing center of the brain. Here are some other functions of the occipital lobe:

  • Visual-spatial processing
  • Motion and color acknowledgment

Since the skull protects the occipital lobe, injury is less most likely to take place. Nevertheless, severe damage to the occipital lobe can result in a variety of visual problems including the loss of color recognition, visual hallucinations or illusions, problems recognizing items, and trouble understanding language.



Updated: September 20, 2016 — 3:00 am

The Author

Reyus Mammadli

Healthy lifestyle advisor. Bachelor Degree of Medical Equipment and Electronics.
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