Body Aches After Sex

The differences between regular after-sex symptoms and a sexual disease are minor. The same after sex symptom may also mean a sex disease.

The differences between regular after-sex symptoms and a sexual disease are minor. The same after sex symptom may also mean a sex disease.

In the first joyous moments right after sex, you’re probably not thinking of exactly what’s happening with your body in that precise moment (except possibly how amazing you feel). After all, thinking of the possibility of a UTI after sex is most likely the least sexy location your mind could roam, right? However even in those instant post-coital minutes, you might seem like some weird things are happening with your body, specifically if you remain in a little pain and questioning why sex may harm or offer you some other unusual response.

It is very important to remember that sex, no matter how you do it, is a physical act including your whole body, so your body might react in weird methods, such as your skin flushing or there being a minor burning when you pee. Don’t go nuts! We’re here to inform you some of the typical things that can occur to your body post-sex, and why they’re primarily NBD.

Common Causes of Body Pain after Sex

Obviously, we * should * explain that if you’re having any type of repeating physical reaction to sex, you ought to see your physician to make sure whatever is OKAY and to put your mind at ease.

But as for these small signs? They’re really pretty typical.

1. Pain and Body Aches

The umbrella term for agonizing sex is dyspareunia, which covers genital pain that may happen just before, during, or after intercourse. It’s remarkably common and can seem like anything from a dull ache to cramping. Board-certified ob-gyn and cohost of The Doctors Jennifer Ashton, MD, told Prevention.com in 2016 that this typically occurs due to the release of the hormonal agent oxytocin throughout sex, which can trigger uterine contractions. If it just happens sometimes or the discomfort is mild, it’s truly NBD. However if the pain is persistent, you need to set up an appointment with your gyno to rule out any bigger health issues.

Nora says: Sex has been the last thing on my mind recently and I gave in to my spouse. Afterwards, I had serious pain and cramping in my abdominal area but after 15-20 minutes it lastly disappeared with some tears.

2. Bleeding from Vagina

If you’re not on your period and you see a little blood after sex, it might stress you, but possibilities are, it’s nothing to be concerned about. Naturally, if there is a large quantity of blood, you will absolutely wish to let your medical professional understand, but a couple of areas here and there are absolutely nothing to worry about. It can be brought on by inflammation of the cervix, or small tears in the vagina after an especially rough romp. It can also take place if you’re with a new partner who is on the * ahem * bigger side. However, if there’s frequently blood after sex, you’ll wish to get looked for sexually transferred infections or other health issues down south.

3. Burning

If you feel a little burning or stinging when you pee right after sex (and you are constantly peeing right after sex, right?), your first impulse may be that you have a urinary tract or sexually transmitted infection. However really, small burning and stinging is quite common, offered that it disappears within a few hours. Ashton told Prevention.com what’s actually going on with this, explaining: “There can be some engorgement of vaginal tissues, and given that the urethra is so closely located to the vagina, that can cause short-term burning or stinging with urinating after sex.” It’s much easier to prevent this by making certain you’re fully lubricated and prepared for sexual intercourse, and naturally, urinating right before and after sexual activity.

Paula states: One day of sex, feels like I’ve been having sex 6 days in a row non stop. Ive been putting it off too. But … I give in sometimes. It’s regular. I haven’t asked my doc about it yet, but I believe it’s due the uterus being sensitive, and more blood flow which makes whatever more sensitive. Dh (dear hubby) has to keep away from my boobs too. Till additional notice.

4. Itchy Vagina

If you’re experiencing some type of skin reaction on the outer part of the vulva, or near your thighs or abdominal areas, it might be a response to the lubrication, the condom, particularly if you’re checking out a brand-new item or brand name. If you haven’t utilized any brand-new products, it’s possible that you have established a semen allergic reaction, which can occur at any time. Yikes.

If your symptoms are minor, it may be a one-time reaction, but if you’re experiencing hives, swelling, or any other strong physical reaction, you’ll want to seek medical attention ASAP. However minor itchies are typically NBD and can disappear on their own. Whew.

5. Pee Signals

We’ve already revealed the significance of peeing before and after sex, but what happens when you feel a sudden strong urge to pee following P in V? It might be a number of reasonably harmless things, however it’s more than likely due to those uterine contractions we told you about earlier, or bladder spasms, which are not unsafe and usually short-term.

6. Bad Smell

Let’s be genuine: Sex includes a lot of physical activity, which suggests things might get a little sweaty. Plus, when your distinct body odors are combining with somebody else’s, you might create a little a stink. It’s typically no huge deal, although if you ever have a consistent fishy or otherwise nasty smell, you’ll wish to talk to your doctor.

7. Flushy Cheeks

We’ll spare you the nonsense about sex being this joyous, fantastic experience that leaves both partners radiating with pleasure, due to the fact that in some cases, your skin gets a little flush, and it’s not from your post-O glow. Jonathan Schaffir, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University explained the “sex flush” to Bustle, stating: “Many ladies experience a ‘sex flush’ during stimulation. Relaxation of blood vessels can trigger a noticeable, red discoloration of the skin of the neck and chest that may go undetected with the lights off.”

8. Irritation or Friction

When you’re bumpin’ and grindin’ with your boo, it’s easy to see how all that skin-on-skin contact could trigger some irritation or friction. This can particularly occur when one or both partners has pubic hair or facial hair, and can show up in the form of a rash or raw skin inflammation. It’s usually nothing to go nuts about, however if it does not disappear, contact your MD.

9. Semen Leakage

If you’re trying to get pregnant (or using a kind of birth control aside from condoms), you may be amazed when some semen leakages out of you post-sex. This is completely normal and makes perfect sense. After all, your body isn’t really absorbing the semen, so there’s really nowhere else for it to go. You can clear this up by cleaning completely after sexual intercourse, and tackle your day as normal.

10. Other

If you experience any type of strong feeling after sex, whether it’s feeling all of a sudden depressed, angry, or agitated (referred to as postcoital dysphoria, or “post-sex blues”) or an extreme feeling of bliss, blame it on the flood of hormonal agents released when you’re getting down and unclean. If you’re feeling suddenly bleak, it might be since of the drop of dopamine levels that can happen after an orgasm, leading to the worst physical reaction to the best physical minute ever.

Weird Muscular Aches All Over the Body

Exactly what is this after sex muscular pain? These are some reasons:

  • Colon inflammation: Orgasmic contractions (vaginal and pelvic) force pressure into the colon which could trigger swelling for some time.
  • Tension on the muscular pelvic area: Since a great deal of pressure concentrates in that area, muscular tension boosts, even more, if you were a long time in one sexual position. The groin muscles aren’t usually used on a daily basis.
  • Anxiety side effect: The discomfort and the satisfaction go together in the same brain zone. Yet, you need to not get confused with the pain triggered by penetration (dyspareunia), given that this type of discomfort is not normal and they originate from vaginal infections or inflammation.
  • Vaginal vault prolapse: If you aren’t lubed well enough penetration strength is most likely to hurt your vagina.

On the other hand, if you experience a raised state of mind, it’s likely due to the rush of oxytocin providing you that delighted, smiley feeling. Both responses are totally normal, unless they’re disrupting your sexual encounters in a way you’re concerned about. Because case, as always, check in with your doc to make sure all is well in the loooove department.


Last modified: June 3, 2018

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