Stomach Feels Burning

Burning Sensation in the Stomach

Burning in the stomach, also called dyspepsia, is not an uncommon event. A person in four people get dyspepsia at some time in their lives. Over-the-counter medications can help eliminate stomach burning in many cases, however consistent or severe burning will need assessment and treatment by your doctor.

Symptoms

Symptoms of dyspepsia may include gnawing or burning pain, bloating, burping, heartburn, loss of appetite, queasiness and vomiting. Your symptoms may be consistent or may only occur periodically or after eating.

Causes

Dyspepsia can be a sign of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. A weakness in the sphincter at the bottom of the esophagus or insufficient closure of the sphincter allows food and stomach acid to recede into the esophagus if you have GERD. Dyspepsia can also signify a stomach ulcer or gastritis, an inflammation of the lining of your stomach. Regular use of anti-inflammatory medications can aggravate the stomach and cause burning pain.

Medical diagnosis

Blood, breath and stool tests can identify H. pylori antibodies which can cause gastritis and stomach ulcers. Your doctor may likewise suggest an X-ray of your small intestine and stomach and an upper intestinal endoscopy if you struggle with burning pain in your stomach. During the procedure, your doctor uses a lighted tube inserted in your mouth to examine your gastrointestinal system from your esophagus to your small intestine. Your doctor can also eliminate suspicious tissue from the lining of your stomach and test it for H. pylori or other issues during an endoscopy. If tests suggest the presence of H. pylori, your doctor might ask for follow-up tests after treatment to guarantee that the antibodies have been gotten rid of.

How to Treat a Burning Sensation in the Stomach

Treatment of burning in the stomach depends upon the cause. Cutting down on anti-inflammatory use or taking another form of medication can assist ease burning pain triggered by taking too many anti-inflammatories. If you have gastritis or GERD, your doctor may suggest that you take antacids to reduce the effects of acids in your stomach. Non-prescription and prescription-strength acid blockers and proton pump inhibitors help in reducing or obstruct acid production and aid heal inflamed tissue in the esophagus.

Doctors prescribe antibiotics, bismuth and proton pump inhibitors if H. pylori antibodies cause gastritis or a stomach ulcer. Proton pump inhibitors can also be valuable if your ulcer is not triggered by H. pylori antibodies, according to Medline Plus.

What Else to Pay Attention to

See your doctor if burning continues for more than a week, in spite of home treatment. In uncommon cases, burning stomach pain can be a sign of stomach cancer. Other possible symptoms of stomach cancer include indigestion, nausea, heartburn, unexplained weight reduction, problem swallowing, blood in the stool, vomiting, trouble swallowing or fluid build-up in the abdominal area.

Non-prescription medications can help eliminate stomach burning in some cases, but persistent or severe burning will require assessment and treatment by your doctor.

Dyspepsia can also be a sign of a stomach ulcer or gastritis, an inflammation of the lining of your stomach. Your doctor might also advise an X-ray of your small intestine and stomach and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy if you suffer from burning pain in your stomach. Your doctor can also eliminate suspicious tissue from the lining of your stomach and test it for H. pylori or other issues during an endoscopy. In uncommon cases, burning stomach pain can be a sign of stomach cancer.

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